The October Surprise 2008 Edition

Expect plenty of disagreement. Just keep it civil.

What do you think will be the "October Surprise"

Palin "resigns" and is replaced
0
No votes
Capture of Osama Bin Laden
0
No votes
Terrorist Attack
2
50%
Economy issues solved thanks to McCain
1
25%
Economy issues solved thanks to Obama
0
No votes
Rattling the sword at North Korea or Iran
0
No votes
Other
1
25%
 
Total votes: 4

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Beatlesfan03
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Postby Beatlesfan03 » Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:06 pm

If McCain is bringing out the "big guns" now and it backfires, what's left in his arsenal?
Craig

Bennett Cerf
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Postby Bennett Cerf » Tue Oct 07, 2008 1:24 am

Flashback to October 1992...

Upbeat Bush Steps Up Rhetoric

By Ann Devroy
The Washington Post
WARREN, Mich.

Pumped up by the polls and the moment, President Bush raced across Michigan Thursday in rhetorical overdrive, attacking the "way-out, far-out" Democratic ticket on everything from northern spotted owls to his opponent's draft record.

Bush, during his 12th campaign trip to this vital state, was introduced at three stops in Detroit suburbs by Michigan Gov. John M. Engler, who called the contest here "dead-even," the Democratic campaign "dead in the water" and the Bush campaign "hot."

And hot Bush was.

At a midday GOP rally at Macomb Community College, the president unleashed a rhetorical fusillade on Bill Clinton and running mate Sen. Albert Gore Jr., attacking their fitness for office, their character and charging, "My dog Millie knows more about foreign policy than these two bozos."

In particular, Bush targeted Gore, whom he now calls "Ozone Man," or just plain "Ozone." "You know why I call him Ozone Man?" Bush said. "This guy is so far out in the environmental extreme, we'll be up to our neck in owls and outta work for every American. He is way out, far out, man."

While many of his aides were still waking up, Bush started his morning with an hour of television interviews, chortling about how Clinton had been "measuring the Oval Office for drapes" but that now the race had tightened.

Bush, who dismissed pollsters as "nutty" just last week when they showed him at least 10 or 12 points behind the Democrat, liked them more Thursday when polls showed a far narrower lead for Clinton.

In a morning speech to the Chamber of Commerce, a more subdued Bush portrayed Clinton as a typical Democrat who would raise taxes, increase spending, and return the nation to the high-inflation, high-unemployment era of Jimmy Carter.

But even there, Bush slipped into his now-familiar garbled syntax in which he forgets his audience may be hearing a particular line for the first time and fails to tell it the beginning of a story. Or the end. Or the context.

Noting he had criticized the news media for being unfair, he told those in the crowd they should not take their anger out on journalists. "Save your wrath for those faithless Republicans and faithless Democrats who wrote me off about two months ago, because we're going to show that rathole we are going to win this election."

At a later rally, Bush straightened out the rathole reference, citing President Harry S. Truman's complaint that the pundits who predicted he would lose in 1948 "don't know how to pound sand in a rathole."


Those writing him off, Bush said, are like those 1948 pundits. Bush and his aides, who practiced for months in dismissing what the president calls "gloom-and-doom" polls, had the tricky task here Thursday of arguing the president was finally on the move, without mentioning the forbidden "Big Mo."

In 1980, Bush won his first presidential caucus in Iowa and tried running as the candidate with "Big Mo," big momentum. He was soundly defeated because, many suggested, he based his candidacy on momentum not issues. "We don't do Big Mo," said campaign political director Mary Matalin. "we do C.O., cautious optimism." Their optimism is based on public and private polls that show a single digit race -- they say a six point difference -- and an electoral breakdown that while not good, at least makes a win remotely possible if the closing trend continues.

The whole Bush campaign, including the warm up speakers, were charged up Thursday. At the Warren event, Democratic state Sen. Gilbert J. Dinello churned the crowd into a frenzy by calling Clinton a draft-dodger, a liar and a man who "wails, whines and wimps out."

Actor Bruce Willis shouted into the microphone that Clinton was not qualified to be president. "I'm pissed off," Willis shouted, to hear the Democrat say he is qualified. At a later rally, this one at the Gerald Ford Library in Grand Rapids, Willis introduced the former president with the same complaints in language rare for a political rally.

Bush, too, hit on what he said were Clinton's lack of qualifications for the Oval Office because of "waffling" on issues. "You can't be president if you try to be all things to all people," Bush said, complaining Clinton had "if, ands and buts" to explain his positions on every issue. "You cannot have a lot of buts in the Oval Office," Bush screamed, his voice growing hoarse.

Bush aides maintain that the tightening of the polls reflects an electorate uneasy about Clinton's character, and they are doing all they can to keep the dialogue these few remaining days on character, rather than on the economy.

"Here is my appeal," he said. "Barbara and I both have tried to uphold the public trust. And character. Bill Clinton -- Bruce Willis mentioned this, Bruce Willis said that, I mean, Clinton said that it is not the character of the president but the character of the presidency. Wrong. They're locked in. They are interlocked."

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lukpac
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Postby lukpac » Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:16 am

Bennett Cerf wrote:Bush, too, hit on what he said were Clinton's lack of qualifications for the Oval Office because of "waffling" on issues. "You can't be president if you try to be all things to all people," Bush said, complaining Clinton had "if, ands and buts" to explain his positions on every issue. "You cannot have a lot of buts in the Oval Office," Bush screamed, his voice growing hoarse.


Maybe McCain didn't get the memo?
"I know because it is impossible for a tape to hold the compression levels of these treble boosted MFSL's like Something/Anything. The metal particulate on the tape would shatter and all you'd hear is distortion if even that." - VD

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Postby Bennett Cerf » Thu Oct 09, 2008 12:41 am

McCain is now promising an October surprise for Thursday morning.

McCain camp making news in the morning

Will it be gimmicky, sleazy, or both?

Bennett Cerf
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Postby Bennett Cerf » Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:20 am

The big news is... a web ad accusing Obama of hiding his "friendship" with Ayers.

That hardly seems worth the teaser.

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Beatlesfan03
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Postby Beatlesfan03 » Thu Oct 09, 2008 5:29 pm

Next up from the McCain camp: Obama prefers baths over showers.
Craig

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Postby Rspaight » Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:09 pm

McCain Camp: Obama Is Going Negative

Obama's critique of the people yelling "Kill him!" and "Terrorist!" at McCain-Palin rallies is an attack on the good, god-fearing people of America, according to McCain campaign spokesman Brian Rogers:

"Barack Obama's attacks on Americans who support John McCain reveal far more about him than they do about John McCain. It is clear that Barack Obama just doesn't understand regular people and the issues they care about. He dismisses hardworking middle class Americans as clinging to guns and religion, while at the same time attacking average Americans at McCain rallies who are angry at Washington, Wall Street and the status quo.

"Even worse, he attacks anyone who dares to question his readiness to serve as their commander in chief in chief. Raising legitimate questions about record, character and judgment are a vital part of the Democratic process, and Barack Obama's effort to silence and shame those who seek answers should make everyone wonder exactly what he is hiding."
RQOTW: "I'll make sure that our future is defined not by the letters ACLU, but by the letters USA." -- Mitt Romney

Bennett Cerf
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Postby Bennett Cerf » Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:12 pm

Is the sudden appearance of John McCain's conscience the October surprise?

McCain Faces Backlash Over Rabid Crowds

John McCain was booed by his own supporters during a rally on Friday after he described Barack Obama as a "decent person and a person that you do not have to be scared of as president of the United States."

McCain was responding to a town hall attendee who claimed he was concerned about raising a child under a president who "cohorts with domestic terrorists such as [Bill] Ayers." Despite the fact that McCain and his campaign have repeatedly used Ayers to hammer Obama in recent days, the Arizona Senator tried to calm the man.

"[Senator Obama] is a decent person and a person that you do not have to be scared about as President of the United States," he said, before adding: "If I didn't think I would be one heck of a better president I wouldn't be running."

The crowd groaned with disapproval.


Later, McCain was again pressed about Obama's "other-ness" and again he refused to play ball. "I don't trust Obama," a woman said. "I have read about him. He's an Arab."

"No, ma'am," McCain said several times, shaking his head in disagreement. "He's a decent, family man, [a] citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues and that's what this campaign is all about."


At another point, McCain declared, "If you want a fight, we will fight. But we will be respectful. I admire Sen. Obama and his accomplishments." Supporters booed then also. "I don't mean that has to reduce your ferocity," McCain responded. "I just mean to say you have to be respectful."

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Rspaight
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Postby Rspaight » Fri Oct 10, 2008 9:24 pm

Wow. :shock: It's strange to see him suddenly try to put out the fire that he so carefully stoked.

Reading that after the comments from Brian Rogers that I posted, I wonder if McCain's campaign feels that John McCain "doesn't understand regular people and the issues they care about."
Last edited by Rspaight on Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
RQOTW: "I'll make sure that our future is defined not by the letters ACLU, but by the letters USA." -- Mitt Romney

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Beatlesfan03
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Postby Beatlesfan03 » Fri Oct 10, 2008 10:42 pm

Or is this the October surprise?

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/10/10/ ... index.html

Panel: Palin abused power in trooper case

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (CNN) -- Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin abused her power as Alaska's governor and violated state ethics law by trying to get her ex-brother-in-law fired from the state police, a state investigator's report concluded Friday.

"Gov. Palin knowingly permitted a situation to continue where impermissible pressure was placed on several subordinates in order to advance a personal agenda," the report states.

Public Safety Commissioner Walt Monegan's refusal to fire State Trooper Mike Wooten from the state police force was "likely a contributing factor" to Monegan's July dismissal, but Palin had the authority as governor to fire him, the report by former Anchorage prosecutor Stephen Branchflower states.

However, it states that her efforts to get Wooten fired broke a state ethics law that bars public officials from pursuing personal interest through official action.

Monegan has said he was fired in July after refusing pressure to sack Wooten, who had gone through an acrimonious divorce and custody battle with Palin's sister.

Palin and her husband, Todd, have consistently denied wrongdoing, describing Wooten as a "rogue trooper" who had threatened their family -- allegations Branchflower discounted.

"I conclude that such claims of fear were not bona fide and were offered to provide cover for the Palins' real motivation: to get Trooper Wooten fired for personal family reasons," Branchflower wrote.

The Branchflower report states Todd Palin used his wife's office and its resources to press for Wooten's removal, and the governor "failed to act" to stop it. But because Todd Palin is not a state employee, the report makes no finding regarding his conduct.

The bipartisan Legislative Council, which commissioned the investigation after Monegan was fired, unanimously adopted the 263-page public report after a marathon executive session Friday.

About 1,000 more pages of documents compiled during the inquiry will remain confidential because they involve private personnel matters, according to the council's chairman, state Sen. Kim Elton.

"I believe that these findings may help people come to a conclusion on how they should vote" in the presidential election, Elton said.

McCain-Palin campaign spokeswoman Meg Stapleton said Palin would cooperate with the Personnel Board investigation. The Palins' lawyer has said an investigator named by that board wants to question them in late October.

Stapleton called the investigation "a partisan-led inquiry" run by supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, but hailed its finding that Monegan's firing broke no law.

"Gov. Palin was cleared of the allegation of an improper firing, which is what this investigation was approved to look into," she said.

Stapleton went on to say that the Legislature exceeded its mandate in finding an ethics violation. "Lacking evidence to support the original Monegan allegation, the Legislative Council seriously overreached, making a tortured argument to find fault without basis in law or fact."

Rep. John Coghill, a Republican who criticized the handling of the investigation, said it was "well-done professionally."

He said Palin "bumped right against the edges" of the state's ethics laws but that he would give "the benefit of the doubt to the governor, though, at this point."

Palin originally agreed to cooperate with the Legislative Council inquiry, and disclosed in August that her advisers had contacted Department of Public Safety officials nearly two dozen times regarding her ex-brother-in-law.

But once she became Sen. John McCain's running mate, her advisers began painting the investigation as a weapon of Democratic partisans.

Ahead of Friday's hearing, Palin supporters wearing clown costumes and carrying balloons denounced the probe as a "kangaroo court" and a "three-ring circus" led by supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama.

The state senator managing the probe, Sen. Hollis French, fueled those complaints with a September 2 interview in which he warned the inquiry could yield an "October Surprise" for the GOP. But Palin's lawyers already had begun pushing for the state Personnel Board to launch its own investigation, calling it the proper legal venue for the matter.

"The report speaks for itself," French told CNN Friday night.
Craig

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Postby Rspaight » Sun Oct 12, 2008 12:51 pm

God's endorsement is the October surprise!

Speaker at McCain rally says non-Christians want an Obama win
Posted: 09:30 PM ET

From CNN Political Producer Tasha Diakides

DAVENPORT, Iowa (CNN) – A minister delivering the invocation at John McCain’s rally in Davenport, Iowa Saturday told the crowd non-Christian religions around the world were praying for Barack Obama to win the U.S. presidential election.

“There are millions of people around this world praying to their god—whether it’s Hindu, Buddha, Allah—that his opponent wins, for a variety of reasons. And Lord, I pray that you will guard your own reputation, because they’re going to think that their God is bigger than you, if that happens,” said Arnold Conrad, the former pastor of Grace Evangelical Free Church in Davenport.

The remark was made before McCain arrived at the rally but the Republican nominee's campaign quickly put out a statement distancing itself from the remarks.

“While we understand the important role that faith plays in informing the votes of Iowans, questions about the religious background of the candidates only serve to distract from the real questions in this race about Barack Obama's judgment, policies and readiness to lead as commander in chief,” said McCain campaign spokesperson Wendy Riemann.

This incident comes a day after a Minnesota voter asked Senator McCain if Barack Obama was an Arab at a town hall in Lakeville, Minnesota and just three days after Lehigh GOP County Chairman Bill Platt made a speech at a McCain rally in Pennsylvania where he refered to the Democrat nominee for president as Barack Hussein Obama.
RQOTW: "I'll make sure that our future is defined not by the letters ACLU, but by the letters USA." -- Mitt Romney

Andreas
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Postby Andreas » Sun Oct 12, 2008 2:22 pm

Rspaight wrote:...where he refered to the Democrat nominee for president as Barack Hussein Obama.
Sounds more polite than "that one".

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Postby Bennett Cerf » Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:35 pm

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Postby Rspaight » Sun Oct 19, 2008 8:25 am

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RQOTW: "I'll make sure that our future is defined not by the letters ACLU, but by the letters USA." -- Mitt Romney

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Postby Bennett Cerf » Tue Oct 28, 2008 10:18 pm

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em?

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